RoboThespian: Uncanny or Just Plain Unpleasant?

RoboThespian  is disturbing.

I think this particularly humanoid robot has climbed out of the uncanny valley of discomfort, and ambled out onto the  plain of extremely annoying coworker. Disney animatronics gone walkabout.

RoboThespian is a life sized humanoid robot designed for human interaction in a public environment. It is fully interactive, multilingual, and user-friendly, making it a perfect device with which to communicate and entertain.

Clearly, these guys have done a ton of clever work, integrating human like locomotion, speech synthesis, projection, face tracking, and serious chat bot software.

The standard RoboThespian design offers over 30 degrees of freedom, a plethora of sensors, and embedded software incorporating text-to-speech synthesis in 20 languages, facial tracking and expression recognition. The newly developed RoboThespian 4.0 will offer a substantial upgrade, adding additional motion range in the upper body and the option of highly adept manipulative hands.”

What can you do with all this? I think the key clue is that the programming is done via a GUI enviroment  Blender

which means that you basically create a computer generated scene, which is “rendered” in physical robots.

Much of the spectacular effect is due to well coordinated facial expressions, head movement, and speech. The robot also has sensors to detect people and especially faces, and to orient to them. It also has facial expression recongnition, which lets it “reproduce” facial expressions. All these effects are “uncanny”, and make the beast appear to be talking to you (or singing at you). Ick!

All this is in the pursuit of…I’m not sure what.


I grant you that this is a great effect, at least on video. But what is it for?

The title and demos https://www.engineeredarts.co.uk/robothespian/theatre-of-robots/ suggests that it replaces human thespians (live onstage), which seems far fetched. If you want mechanized theater, you always have computer generated movies. As far as I can tell, the main use case is for advertising, e.g., trade show demos. It either replaces human presenters (demo babes) or it replaces video billboards.

They also suggest that this is a good device for telepresence, It “can inhabit an environment in a more human manner; it’s the next best thing to being there.”   I’m not at all sure about that. Humanoid appearance is not really important for effective telepresence in most cases, and there is no reason to think this humanioid is well suited for any give telepresence situation.

Let me be clear: this product is really nicely done.  I do appreciate a well crafted system, integrating lots of good ideas.

But I really don’t see that roboThespian is anything other than a flashy gimmick. (Human actors are way, way cheaper, and probably better.)

On the other hand, when I saw the first computer mouse on campus, I declared that it was a useless (and stupid) interface, and no one would ever use it.   I was wrong about mice (Boy was I wrong!), so my intuitions about humanoid chatter bots may be wildly off.

Update May 4 2017:  Corrected to indicated taht Engineering Arts does not use Blender, as the original post said. I must have seen some out of date information.  EngArt have their own environment which, if not built from Blender, is built to look just like it.  Thanks to Joe Wollaston for the correction.

 

Robot Wednesday

4 thoughts on “RoboThespian: Uncanny or Just Plain Unpleasant?”

  1. Hello Robert

    Joe here from Engineered Arts the creators of RoboThespian, Great post I can see you have some interesting opinions about RT.
    Perhaps a slight underestimation on the robots practical applications however, If I could direct you to this link: http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-theatre-spillikin-idUKKBN16K282
    Its not easy getting work as an action robot, no such equal opportunities and because of the irresponsible behaviour of units like Terminator there seems to be a certain stigma attached to humanoid robots.
    But RoboThespian was built to act, he’s a lover not a fighter.
    Currently we have over 100 of our robots around the world, in museums, science centres and visitor attractions. Interacting with visitors and customers or explaining difficult concepts such as the universe at the NASA Kennedy space centre or robotics at the Science Museum London.
    Also we don’t use blender we have however, developed out own Virtual Robot program to manipulate the robots movements.
    If you have any questions about what we do or our robots id be happy to give you an interview.
    Just get in contact via the website. Looking forward to hearing from you,

    Joe

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s